Motorcycle Accident and Safety Resources

Motorcycle Helmet Use and Head and Facial Injuries Crash Outcomes (PDF)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2009
DOT HS 811 208
Examines the relationship between motorcycle helmet use and motorcycle crash outcomes in terms of injury types, hospital charges, and other variables employing data from the Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System.

Motorcycle Trends in the United States (PDF)
Bureau of Transportation Statistics Special Report, May 2009
The growth in motorcycle sales and registrations in the United States has been accompanied by an increase in accidents, property losses, injuries, and fatalities involving motorcycles.

Legislative Facts 2008: Motorcycle Helmet Use Laws (PDF)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008
This report cites statistics showing the safety benefits of motorcycle helmets. For example, head injuries are a leading cause of death in motorcycle crashes. Unhelmeted motorcyclists are three times more likely to suffer brain injury and 40 percent more likely to suffer a fatal head injury than helmeted motorcyclists.

Guidance for Implementation of the AASHTO Strategic Highway Safety Plan: A Guide for Addressing Collisions Involving Motorcycles
Transportation Research Board, 2009
NCHRP Report 500, Vol. 22
Provides guidance on strategies that can be employed to reduce crashes involving motorcycles.

Evaluation of the reinstatement of the helmet law in Louisiana (PDF)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008

Methodology for Determining Motorcycle Operator Crash Risk and Alcohol Impairment. Volume I: Synthesis Report on Alternative Approaches with Priorities for Research (PDF)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2007
DOT HS 810 761
Alcohol involvement continues to be a prominent factor in motorcycle crashes. Drinking and driving have been researched extensively, and the relationship between a drivers’ blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and crash risk is well understood. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the effects of BAC on motorcycle operation is insufficient. Though there is some data available on BAC for crash-involved riders, there is essentially no data on the incidence of alcohol involvement in the onroad motorcycle-riding population. This project examined a variety of approaches by which the effects of alcohol on motorcycle rider impairment and crash risk can be measured.

Methodology for Determining Motorcycle Operator Crash Risk and Alcohol Impairment. Volume 2: Literature Review Report (PDF)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2007
DOT HS 810 762
Alcohol involvement continues to be a prominent factor in motorcycle crashes. Drinking and driving have been researched extensively, and the relationship between a drivers’ blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and crash risk is well understood. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the effects of BAC on motorcycle operation is insufficient. Though there is some data available on BAC for crash-involved riders, there is essentially no data on the incidence of alcohol involvement in the onroad motorcycle-riding population. This project examined a variety of approaches by which the effects of alcohol on motorcycle rider impairment and crash risk can be measured.

Effects of Alcohol on Motorcycle Riding Skills
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2007
DOT HS 810 877

Evaluation of the Reinstatement of the Motorcycle Helmet Law in Louisiana (PDF)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 2008
Traffic Safety Facts 346
This study examined rates of motorcycle helmet use, fatalities, and injuries following reinstatement of the motorcycle helmet law in August 2004.

Major Increase in Head Injuries Noted After Repeal of Pennsylvania’s Motorcycle Helmet Law
American Journal of Public Health, 2008
Pennsylvania motorcyclists suffered large increases in head injury deaths and hospitalizations in the two years following the repeal of its motorcycle helmet law, according to a University of Pittsburgh study.